General Zachary Taylor, Writing from Mexico During the Mexican-American War, Obliges a Boy Who Had Requested His Autograph

Letters of Taylor from Mexico are uncommon, this being just the fourth we have ever had

Purchase $5,500

In 1846, with the United States and Mexico at war, General Zachary Taylor established a base of operations at Camargo, on the Rio Grande, while he awaited reinforcements from the War Department, which had issued a call for volunteers. In September 1846, his army now numbering 6,500, Taylor marched south to lay...

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General Zachary Taylor, Writing from Mexico During the Mexican-American War, Obliges a Boy Who Had Requested His Autograph

Letters of Taylor from Mexico are uncommon, this being just the fourth we have ever had

In 1846, with the United States and Mexico at war, General Zachary Taylor established a base of operations at Camargo, on the Rio Grande, while he awaited reinforcements from the War Department, which had issued a call for volunteers. In September 1846, his army now numbering 6,500, Taylor marched south to lay siege to Monterrey, Mexico’s largest northern city, which was garrisoned by its 5,000-man Army of the North, commanded by General Pedro Ampudia. After three days of fighting, Taylor took the city, setting off celebrations throughout the United States. In early 1847, Taylor pushed south, encountering the Mexican army at Buena Vista, below Saltillo. Taylor’s army repulsed several Mexican assaults on February 22 and 23. Although both sides claimed victory, the battle ended in a stalemate. Nonetheless, Taylor’s Army of Occupation remained firmly in control of northern Mexico, and the battle was hailed as a great victory by the American press.Then Taylor returned to Monterrey, remaining until late November 1847, when he set sail for home. While he spent the following year in command of the Army’s entire western division, his active military career was effectively over. In December he received a hero’s welcome in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, which set the stage for the 1848 presidential election, in which he was nominated by the Whig Party, and elected President.

Very uncommon Letter signed, Headquarters Army of Occupation, Camp near Monterrey, November 4, 1847, to Robert J. Hubbard of Utica, N.Y. “In compliance with the request contained in your letter of September, I take pleasure in affixing my autograph hereunto.” Hubbard was a 15 years old boy, and the son of a prominent attorney who for years was clerk of the New York Supreme Court. The young man obviously collected autographs.

Letters of Taylor from Mexico are uncommon, this being just the fourth we have ever had.

Purchase Now $5,500

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