President Zachary Taylor Appoints a Chief Engineer in the Navy

This is the first Taylor military appointment that we have ever carried

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Purchase $7,500

Benjamin Franklin Isherwood was an engineering officer in the U.S. Navy during the early days of steam-powered warships. He served as a ship’s engineer during the Mexican War, and after the war did experimental work with steam propulsion. Rising to the rank of rear admiral, as Engineer-in-Chief of the Navy during the...

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President Zachary Taylor Appoints a Chief Engineer in the Navy

This is the first Taylor military appointment that we have ever carried

Benjamin Franklin Isherwood was an engineering officer in the U.S. Navy during the early days of steam-powered warships. He served as a ship’s engineer during the Mexican War, and after the war did experimental work with steam propulsion. Rising to the rank of rear admiral, as Engineer-in-Chief of the Navy during the Civil War, he helped to found the Navy’s Bureau of Steam Engineering.

In the wake of the Mexican War, he was promoted by President Zachary Taylor. Document signed, picturing Neptune and naval scenes, October 19, 1849. “I do appoint him a Chief Engineer in the Navy, from the 13th day of September, 1849.” The document is countersigned by Navy Secretary William B. Preston.

Because of his early death in office, documents signed by Taylor as President are much less common than those for any 19th century president besides William Henry Harrison and James Garfield. This is just the third appointment we have had in all these years, and the very first military appointment.

Purchase $7,500

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