Woodrow Wilson Signed Photograph Inscribed to White House Chief Usher Ike Hoover

Wilson sat at Hoover’s desk when he drafted his War Message to Congress in April 1917, and took Hoover with him to France for the Versailles negotiations

Ike Hoover was Chief Usher at the White House from Cleveland’s time until after the Franklin Roosevelts moved in, serving at the White House for 42 years and as Usher for 29 years. Both of these records remain unbroken. His first job was as a telephone operator, but he later became an...

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Woodrow Wilson Signed Photograph Inscribed to White House Chief Usher Ike Hoover

Wilson sat at Hoover’s desk when he drafted his War Message to Congress in April 1917, and took Hoover with him to France for the Versailles negotiations

Ike Hoover was Chief Usher at the White House from Cleveland’s time until after the Franklin Roosevelts moved in, serving at the White House for 42 years and as Usher for 29 years. Both of these records remain unbroken. His first job was as a telephone operator, but he later became an electrician.] He became an employee of the Edison Electric Company, and was sent to the White House in 1891 to install the first electric lights in the executive mansion. At the time, no private building in Washington had electricity. When Hoover finished the installation, he was asked by President Harrison to join the White House staff. In 1904, Hoover accepted a position as an usher at the White House. He was appointed Chief Usher by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1909. During his tenure at the White House, Hoover oversaw the preparations for the funerals of Presidents William McKinley and Warren Harding. He also oversaw the planning for the weddings of the presidential daughters who were married at the White House.

Hoover and Woodrow Wilson became quite close, and Wilson sat at Hoover’s desk when he drafted his War Message to Congress in April 1917. When Wilson traveled to France for peace negotiations at the end of World War I, Hoover traveled with him and controlled the staff and household operations in the palaces where Wilson stayed.

A 10 by 13 inch sepia photograph of Wilson as President by Harris and Ewing, beautifully framed. Provenance: a descendent of Ike Hoover.

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