Signed by President John Tyler, Vice Presidents George M. Dallas and William King, Secretaries of State Daniel Webster and John M. Clayton, numerous Cabinet Members, Thomas Hart Benton, and Dozens of Others

Gales and Seaton were the official printers to Congress. Under the title of Annals of Congress, they published the debates in Congress from 1798 to 1824, together with the more important documents and laws, and under the title Register of Debates in Congress continued the publication in similar form to cover the...

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Signed by President John Tyler, Vice Presidents George M. Dallas and William King, Secretaries of State Daniel Webster and John M. Clayton, numerous Cabinet Members, Thomas Hart Benton, and Dozens of Others

Gales and Seaton were the official printers to Congress. Under the title of Annals of Congress, they published the debates in Congress from 1798 to 1824, together with the more important documents and laws, and under the title Register of Debates in Congress continued the publication in similar form to cover the years 1824–37.

They sent the Houses of Congress copies of their works as they were published. It was the practice at the time for these copies to be acknowledged by groups of congressmen, perhaps representing entire committees. There are 31 signers of this acknowledgment, and their identities dates this as being from the 21st Congress, which was seated in 1829. The Gales and Seaton books for 1829 were acknowledged as received by 31 men, a significant number of whom would soon become prominent in their country’s history.

Document signed, the Senate chamber, Washington, circa 1829: “Received of Walter Lownie, Secretary of the Senate, 4 volumes of the republications of the Public Documents by Gales & Seaton”. The signatories include future: President John Tyler, Vice President George M. Dallas, Vice President William King, Secretary of State Daniel Webster, Secretary of State John M. Clayton, Secretary of War William Wilkins, Attorney General Felix Grundy, Navy Secretary Mahlon Dickerson, and vice presidential candidate Theodore Frelinghuysen. Thomas H. Benton heads the other notables.

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