President Abraham Lincoln Promotes a Union Soldier Badly Wounded at Second Bull Run

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The 11th Pennsylvania Reserves, also known as the 40th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was one of the great fighting regiments of the Union Army. It served in the battles on the Peninsula, at Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and throughout Grant’s Virginia campaign in 1864. It lost over 300 men,...

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President Abraham Lincoln Promotes a Union Soldier Badly Wounded at Second Bull Run

The 11th Pennsylvania Reserves, also known as the 40th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was one of the great fighting regiments of the Union Army. It served in the battles on the Peninsula, at Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and throughout Grant’s Virginia campaign in 1864. It lost over 300 men, and left the front in May 1864. Some of its survivors were transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, a military reserve organization created within the Union Army to allow partially disabled or otherwise infirm soldiers to perform light duty, freeing able-bodied soldiers to serve on the front lines.

One of these was Rowland M. Jones, who started as a sergeant in the 11th Pennsylvania Reserves, was promoted to 2nd lieutenant on June 16, 1862; and to 1st lieutenant on April 19, 1863. In the summer of 1864, just after his regiment left the front, he was assigned to the Veteran Reserve Corps. He had been seriously wounded at Second Bull Run, yet continued to actively serve until then.

Document signed, complete with engravings of an eagle, flags, and military accoutrements, Washington, August 1, 1864, appointing Rowland M. Jones “First Lieutenant in the Veteran Reserve Corps”. The document is countersigned by Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. Jones was discharged from the Veteran Reserve Corps on Christmas Eve 1864 because of the pain he was in. He died in 1885, aged 46.

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