President Abraham Lincoln Appoints a Paymaster to Serve With Gen. George Thomas’s Army of the Cumberland

The appointee was a Michigan attorney who had raised troops for the Union armies, and would go on to serve in Congress

Charles Clinton Ellsworth was a Michigan attorney, county prosecutor, and state legislator. Between 1861-1863, he devoted his time to raising troops for the Union armies. In 1863, President Lincoln rewarded him by appointing him Additional Paymaster with the rank of major, and the War Department attached him to the Army of the...

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President Abraham Lincoln Appoints a Paymaster to Serve With Gen. George Thomas’s Army of the Cumberland

The appointee was a Michigan attorney who had raised troops for the Union armies, and would go on to serve in Congress

Charles Clinton Ellsworth was a Michigan attorney, county prosecutor, and state legislator. Between 1861-1863, he devoted his time to raising troops for the Union armies. In 1863, President Lincoln rewarded him by appointing him Additional Paymaster with the rank of major, and the War Department attached him to the Army of the Cumberland. That army was commanded by General George Thomas, and served in the Western Theater, fighting in the battles of Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and Nashville. He served with the army until the end of the war. After the war he was elected to Congress.

On March 5, 1863, President Lincoln sent Ellsworth’s name to the Senate for confirmation, writing: “I have the honor to propose for your approbation the following named person for appointment in the Volunteer force now in the service of the United States: C. C. Ellsworth, of Michigan, to be additional paymaster.” The Senate confirmed.

Document signed, as President, an ornate, vignetted commission, with an eagle, cannons and flags, Washington, March 23, 1863, appointing “C.C. Ellsworth…Additional Paymaster in the service of the United States…” The document is countersigned by Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton.

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