President Abraham Lincoln Steps In to Direct Secretary of War Edwin Stanton to Allow a Father to Visit His Teenage Son at the Front

Signed by Lincoln and General John H. Martindale, Military Governor of Washington DC

Purchase $11,000

Abraham Lincoln’s attention to the plight of families affected by the War is legendary. This was particularly the case with young people. Lincoln, who lost a son during the war, knew the pain personally.

In 1863, Isaac Hilton, whose son David was a teenage volunteer, wrote a local official to try to...

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President Abraham Lincoln Steps In to Direct Secretary of War Edwin Stanton to Allow a Father to Visit His Teenage Son at the Front

Signed by Lincoln and General John H. Martindale, Military Governor of Washington DC

Abraham Lincoln’s attention to the plight of families affected by the War is legendary. This was particularly the case with young people. Lincoln, who lost a son during the war, knew the pain personally.

In 1863, Isaac Hilton, whose son David was a teenage volunteer, wrote a local official to try to visit that son. That official wrote a letter to the Provost Marshall which then reached General John H. Martindale. Martindale was major general of volunteers, and appointed Military Governor of Washington, D.C., a post he held from November 1862 to May 1864. Martindale approved it, and rather than forwarding it to the Secretary of War, sent it to President Lincoln himself, who determined to intervene.

David Hilton was the musician of the the 104th regiment, a unit charged with protecting the Military District of Washington.

Autograph letter signed, Headquarters Provost Marshall, 15th District, Troy, October 5, 1863, to General Martindale. “Dear Sir, Mr. Isaac Hilton the bearer of this note has a son David Hilton in Company H. 104th regiment New York vol – in 1st Brigade – 2nd Division… and is desiring of visiting him. Mr. Hilton has been a resident of Troy… is a loyal citizen and in all respects a man of good character. G. Robertson.”

Autograph endorsement signed, “I concur in the above.” Signed by Charles Hughes, Provost Marshall.

Autograph endorsement signed, General Martindale, recommending favorable consideration.

Autograph endorsement signed, from the President, October 14, 1863. “Hon. Sec. of War, please see the bearer. A. Lincoln”

A remarkable letter showing the full journey from initial request of a father to an order from President Lincoln to allow that father to see his son.

Purchase Now $11,000

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