President Benjamin Harrison and His Cabinet: Their Final Meeting Together

A card from that event, signed by Harrison, his acting First Lady, and all the Cabinet members and their wives

Purchase $3,000

This is the first time we have had something definitively signed by a president and his cabinet at their final event together

The President’s card with the golden image from the Great Seal of the United States reading “E pluribus unum”, signed by Harrison and his entire cabinet, with all their wives...

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President Benjamin Harrison and His Cabinet: Their Final Meeting Together

A card from that event, signed by Harrison, his acting First Lady, and all the Cabinet members and their wives

This is the first time we have had something definitively signed by a president and his cabinet at their final event together

The President’s card with the golden image from the Great Seal of the United States reading “E pluribus unum”, signed by Harrison and his entire cabinet, with all their wives signing as well. The President’s son Russell collected the signatures, and he notes on the card, which was clearly his place card, “Russell B. Harrison’s card at President Harrison’s farewell cabinet dinner, February 24th, 1893.” This was the last time Harrison and his cabinet would meet, and just eight days later Grover Cleveland took the oath of office and assumed the presidency.

The signatories are: President Benjamin Harrison; Mary Harrison McKee, the President’s daughter and de facto First Lady after her mother’s death; Mary Dimmick, the soon-to-be second wife of the President; Postmaster General John Wanamaker and his wife Mary; Secretary of the Interior John W. Noble and his wife Lizabeth; Treasury Secretary Charles Foster and his wife Ann; Secretary of War S.B. Elkins and his wife Hallie; Secretary of Agriculture Jeremiah M. Rusk and his wife Elizabeth; Attorney General W.H.H. Miller and his wife Gertrude; and Secretary of the Navy B.F. Tracy (whose wife was deceased). Secretary of State John W. Foster had left his post the day before, and no longer in office was not present at the dinner.

This is the first time we have had something definitively signed by a president and his cabinet at their final event together.

Purchase Now $3,000

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