Uncommon Note of President Ulysses S. Grant to His Secretary of the Treasury

As President, Grant adopted the custom of President Lincoln, and kept a small stack of white cards in his desk. When he wanted to send a brief message to his cabinet members or Congressmen, one that would be hand-delivered, he would reach for a white card and write them. Most of these...

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Uncommon Note of President Ulysses S. Grant to His Secretary of the Treasury

As President, Grant adopted the custom of President Lincoln, and kept a small stack of white cards in his desk. When he wanted to send a brief message to his cabinet members or Congressmen, one that would be hand-delivered, he would reach for a white card and write them. Most of these notes were unsigned, but fortunately a portion were signed.
Autograph note signed, Washington, no date but likely from his first term: “Will the Sec. of the Treas. please see Col. M. Dibble and oblige, U.S. Grant.” The Treasury Secretary in Grant’s first term was William Adams Richardson. The reason for the requested visit is not known.

When we first entered this field back in the 1980s, notes such as this were common. But over the years they have disappeared from the market, and this is the first we’ve had in decades.

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