President U.S. Grant Appoints William Badger, Custer Companion During the Indian Wars, to Captain

Badger was quartermaster at Fort Lincoln when Custer's 7th Cavalry was stationed there

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Ulysses S. Grant served as Commanding General of the Army and the 18th President of the United States, the highest positions in the military and the government of the United States. A master strategist and strong leader, Grant led the Union Army to victory over the Confederacy. At the end of war,...

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President U.S. Grant Appoints William Badger, Custer Companion During the Indian Wars, to Captain

Badger was quartermaster at Fort Lincoln when Custer's 7th Cavalry was stationed there

Ulysses S. Grant served as Commanding General of the Army and the 18th President of the United States, the highest positions in the military and the government of the United States. A master strategist and strong leader, Grant led the Union Army to victory over the Confederacy. At the end of war, Grant served as acting Secretary of War, overseeing Reconstruction initiatives and post-war military management.

William Badger was the son of New Hampshire Governor William Badger. He was an 1848 graduate of Dartmouth College and was engaged in manufacturing before the Civil War. In the war he served as Captain and Colonel of the 4th New Hampshire Volunteers.

During the post-war period, Badger was commissioned as a Lieutenant in the 6th US Infantry and was the quartermaster at Standing Rock and Fort Rice in the Dakota Territory. He was quartermaster at Fort Lincoln when Custer’s 7th Cavalry was stationed there at the height of the Indian Wars, and he personally associated with General Custer.

Document Signed by Grant as Interim Secretary of War, Washington, October 31, 1867, on War Department letterhead, appointing William Badger “for gallantry and meritorious services during the war, a Captain by Brevet” in the U.S. Army.

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