President James Buchanan Orders the Exchange of Ratifications of Two Treaties With Chile, Thus Putting Them into Effect

One of a very few treaty implementation documents between the U.S. and a South American country we have ever carried

On May 27, 1856, at Santiago, Chile, a treaty of friendship, commerce, navigation, and extradition was concluded between the United States and Chile. Then, on December 1 of that year, a treaty determining the rights, privileges, and duties of the consuls of the two countries was signed. These two treaties were submitted...

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President James Buchanan Orders the Exchange of Ratifications of Two Treaties With Chile, Thus Putting Them into Effect

One of a very few treaty implementation documents between the U.S. and a South American country we have ever carried

On May 27, 1856, at Santiago, Chile, a treaty of friendship, commerce, navigation, and extradition was concluded between the United States and Chile. Then, on December 1 of that year, a treaty determining the rights, privileges, and duties of the consuls of the two countries was signed. These two treaties were submitted to the U.S. Senate for ratification, and on March 10, 1857, the treaties were ratified. President Buchanan ordered that the ratifications of the treaties be exchanged, and thus that the treaties be put into effect.

Document signed as President, Washington, April 17, 1857. “I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to a power authorizing John Bigler, Esq. to exchange my ratifications for those of the President of Chile, of the Treaties between the United States and that Republic, signed on 27 May & 1 December 1856.” This is one of a very few treaty implementation documents between the U.S. and a South American country we have ever carried.

Bigler was not merely a courier to exchange treaties, but was going to Chile as the new American ambassador to that nation. He served there for four years.

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