The United States Orders Ratification of Its Revised Treaty of 1857 With Siam, Which Was the First U.S. Treaty With Any Asian Nation

An uncommon document, this being the only the second Asian treaty ratification we have handled in all our decades in the field, showing the actions between the US and its first Asian partner

The Treaty of Amity and Commerce between His Majesty the Magnificent King of Siam and the United States of America, signed in 1833, was the first treaty between the United States and any Asian nation. In 1856, U.S. diplomat Townsend Harris and Siamese King Rama IV negotiated a revised “Treaty of Amity,...

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The United States Orders Ratification of Its Revised Treaty of 1857 With Siam, Which Was the First U.S. Treaty With Any Asian Nation

An uncommon document, this being the only the second Asian treaty ratification we have handled in all our decades in the field, showing the actions between the US and its first Asian partner

The Treaty of Amity and Commerce between His Majesty the Magnificent King of Siam and the United States of America, signed in 1833, was the first treaty between the United States and any Asian nation. In 1856, U.S. diplomat Townsend Harris and Siamese King Rama IV negotiated a revised “Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation,” which placed limits on import duties and export taxes. That same year, the J.W. Parker Company became the first American firm to open in Bangkok, followed by the American Rice Mill in 1858.

Document signed, Washington, March 17, 1857, authorizing the Secretary of State to affix the Great Seal of the United States “to a power authorizing W.C. Bradley, Consul of the U. States at Ningpo, China, to exchange the ratifications of the Treaty between the U.States and Siam, concluded at Bangkok on the 29th of May last.”

An uncommon document, this being the only the second Asian treaty ratification we have handled in all our decades in the field.

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