In a Christmas Card from 1930, Thomas Wolfe Writes that He Also “sent one to Oscar Wilde wishing him ‘lots of choir boys.’”

This humorous note is unpublished, and unknown until now

Purchase $3,000

William Faulkner once said that Thomas Wolfe, who died before age 40, may have been the greatest talent of his generation for aiming higher than any other writer. His influence extends to the writings of Beat Generation writer Jack Kerouac, and to authors Ray Bradbury and Philip Roth, among others. He was...

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In a Christmas Card from 1930, Thomas Wolfe Writes that He Also “sent one to Oscar Wilde wishing him ‘lots of choir boys.’”

This humorous note is unpublished, and unknown until now

William Faulkner once said that Thomas Wolfe, who died before age 40, may have been the greatest talent of his generation for aiming higher than any other writer. His influence extends to the writings of Beat Generation writer Jack Kerouac, and to authors Ray Bradbury and Philip Roth, among others. He was one of the first masters of autobiographical fiction, and his work was filled with details that came from his own life and his home in North Carolina, as well as that of his friends in New York.

Henry Hart was an editor at Scribner’s. The two had a close and long relationship and corresponded as friends. In Christmas 1930 Wolfe wrote to Hart, with some cheeky remarks, one referencing Oscar Wilde and the other Calvin Coolidge.

Christmas note signed, London, December 12, 1930, to Hart. “To wish you health and happiness at Christmas and lots of trips to Philadelphia throughout the coming year. Tom Wolfe.” He writes in his own hand, “These cards are wonderful things – you buy a half dozen and just fill in what seems the most appropriate. Simple for the people you know, I sent one to Oscar Wilde wishing him ‘lots of choir boys,’ only I got it mixed up with the one I sent to Coolidge wishing him lots of nice perle county butter; I guess they’re reading each others cards now.”

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