John Steinbeck Writes of Ed Ricketts, One of His Great Influences, “I miss him terribly, still.”

Acquired from the recipient and never before offered for sale

In 1951, John Steinbeck published “The Log from the Sea of Cortez”. It details a six-week marine specimen-collecting boat expedition he made in 1940 at various sites in the Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez), with his friend, the marine biologist Ed Ricketts. It is regarded as one...

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John Steinbeck Writes of Ed Ricketts, One of His Great Influences, “I miss him terribly, still.”

Acquired from the recipient and never before offered for sale

In 1951, John Steinbeck published “The Log from the Sea of Cortez”. It details a six-week marine specimen-collecting boat expedition he made in 1940 at various sites in the Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez), with his friend, the marine biologist Ed Ricketts. It is regarded as one of Steinbeck’s most important works of non-fiction, chiefly because of the involvement of Ricketts, who shaped Steinbeck’s thinking and provided the prototype for many of the pivotal characters in his fiction, and for the insights it gives into the philosophies of the two men. Ricketts died in 1948, but he remained a profound influence on Steinbeck, who called called him “half Christ, half satyr.”

In 1960, scholar Ed Sheehan wrote Steinbeck, referencing the death of Ricketts.

Autograph letter signed, May 18, 1960, to Ed Sheehan. “Many thanks, and be sure that if I ever get down there I will call you. However, with the work I have undertaken, God knows when that will be. Glad you liked Ed. I miss him terribly, still.”

A rare letter of Steinbeck referencing one of his great influences.

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