Henri Matisse Writes to One of the Founders of the Museum of Modern Art, Planning His Great 1931 Exhibit at that Brand New Institution

Henri Matisse is one of the best known of the early 20th century artists, who rose to prominence as the leader of the Fauve movement, which substituted color and broad and bold brush strokes for the light and shade interplay of Impressionism.

Purchase $4,200

Matisse was “organizing the next exposition of my works of which I spoke to you…”

In 1929, Matisse temporarily stopped painting easel pictures. He then traveled to America to sit on the jury of the 29th Carnegie International, which is the oldest North American exhibition of contemporary art from around the globe....

Read More

Henri Matisse Writes to One of the Founders of the Museum of Modern Art, Planning His Great 1931 Exhibit at that Brand New Institution

Henri Matisse is one of the best known of the early 20th century artists, who rose to prominence as the leader of the Fauve movement, which substituted color and broad and bold brush strokes for the light and shade interplay of Impressionism.

Matisse was “organizing the next exposition of my works of which I spoke to you…”

In 1929, Matisse temporarily stopped painting easel pictures. He then traveled to America to sit on the jury of the 29th Carnegie International, which is the oldest North American exhibition of contemporary art from around the globe. Then in 1930, he spent some time in Tahiti and New York as well as Baltimore, Maryland. From there he went to Merion, Pennsylvania, home of perhaps the most important collector of modern art (and owner of the largest Matisse holdings in America), Dr. Albert Barnes. Barnes commissioned the artist to paint a large mural for the two-story picture gallery of his mansion.

Lizzie Plummer Bliss was an American art collector and patron. In 1929, she played an essential role in the founding of the Museum of Modern Art. 150 works of art from her collection served as a foundation to the museum and formed the basis of the in-house collection. These included works by artists such as Paul Cézanne, Georges Seurat, Paul Gauguin, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso and Amedeo Modigliani. The first exhibit at MOMA was in 1929; the organization was brand new.

Matisse and Bliss met while he was in New York and discussed a coming exhibit of his work at the MOMA.

Typed letter signed, Nice, January 16, 1931, to Mrs. Bliss. “Dear Mademoiselle, On my return, the calm of the sea, the temperature of Spring gave to my journey a great sweetness. It permitted me to think, each time with more pleasure, of the welcome given to me in New York and particularly each time I passed by your home. Permit me to once again thank you.

“In organizing the next exposition of my works of which I spoke to you, it came to me that one of my paintings that I consented to loan is covered by glass. This method of perfect protection against dust becomes dangerous if one moves the painting. I would like therefore to ask you to permit the men who come to collect the paintings to remove this glass, which will be replaced on its return, whether it is the exposition in New York or that of Paris. If you see no inconvenience, I will ask Mr. Rosen to pass by to clean the paintings.

“I would be very happy if you were able to come to Paris this summer. You will see there, in midst of a great part of my work, the two paintings you own. You will already be familiar probably with the large majority of my sculptures if you pass by the Galerie Brummer, where they are presently exhibited.”

The Matisse exhibit opened in late 1931. But Mrs. Bliss died in the spring of that year, so alas did not see it completed.

Purchase Now $4,200

Frame, Display, Preserve

Each frame is custom constructed, using only proper museum archival materials. This includes:The finest frames, tailored to match the document you have chosen. These can period style, antiqued, gilded, wood, etc. Fabric mats, including silk and satin, as well as museum mat board with hand painted bevels. Attachment of the document to the matting to ensure its protection. This "hinging" is done according to archival standards. Protective "glass," or Tru Vue Optium Acrylic glazing, which is shatter resistant, 99% UV protective, and anti-reflective. You benefit from our decades of experience in designing and creating beautiful, compelling, and protective framed historical documents.

Learn more about our Framing Services