An Unpublished Journal of a Voyage Down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers from Indiana to Mississippi Via Steamship

The document from the Milroy family, which included Union general Robert Milroy, describes a convalescence trip to the South, where Mrs. Milroy would die

Purchase $1,500

Manuscript, 46 long pages, October 26 through January 1, 1837, journal in the hand of Henry Bruce Milroy, documenting his final trip with his wife down down the Wabash and Ohio Rivers, first on the Steamer Concord, then aboard a boat at the junction of the two rivers, then on the Mississippi...

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An Unpublished Journal of a Voyage Down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers from Indiana to Mississippi Via Steamship

The document from the Milroy family, which included Union general Robert Milroy, describes a convalescence trip to the South, where Mrs. Milroy would die

Manuscript, 46 long pages, October 26 through January 1, 1837, journal in the hand of Henry Bruce Milroy, documenting his final trip with his wife down down the Wabash and Ohio Rivers, first on the Steamer Concord, then aboard a boat at the junction of the two rivers, then on the Mississippi on the Steamer Columbus. The latter headed toward New Orleans and there is a description of the passage aboard that boat. He describes the “squalling of children in the ladies cabin, and the noise of their black nurses and chattering mothers. To the disturbances on the boat might be added a lot of gamblers and wine and brandy drinkers – at the head of whom “Old Poindexter” [George Poindexter, Jackson-era politician] made rather the largest figure. Who appeared to keep “mellow” all the time and on two or three occasions got quite drunk. He certainly done the state which he formerly represented in Congress but little credit in my estimation with his long red nose and eager impatience for being engaged constantly in gambling. It certainly had a most sickening appearance, gray hairs, and splendid talents combined in a confirmed gambler touched off with a constant flow of profane language…”

At this point they enter the Mississippi and land at Memphis and then on to Helena, Arkansas. They board the Steamer Commerce, which was run into by the Steam Boat Yazoo, and that accident is described. They then arrived at Natchez, where they stayed at Parker’s hotel. They then move to a home of Mrs. Glover, who takes them in. An account of life there is given.

The majority of the extensive manuscript is a detailed and day-by-day account of Mrs. Milroy’s health and then slow agonizing death, including visits by doctors, medicines taken, her symptoms. It is a story of his love for his wife, their trip to hope she healed in Natchez in the South and then his broken heart. Along the way, he gives much insight into the journey.

This is an unpublished manuscript deep in content and never before offered for sale.

Purchase Now $1,500

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