James Monroe

You can find Monroe autographs and historical documents from all periods of his public life. He wrote many autograph letters, and some are full of valuable detail and plain talk. His handwriting can be notoriously hard to read.

About Collecting James Monroe Autographs


Whereas the letters of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson could be full of philosophy and argument, James Monroe's were full of rich detail and plain talk, and constituted thorough expositions of the matters at hand. Though a diplomat and not indiscreet, he did not shrink from saying directly what he wanted, making his letters illuminating and educational. He was also a man who preferred to write out his own letters, and even as president used secretaries very sparingly. Thus you will find letters from all periods of his life, after he began public service. His handwriting exhibited little change over the years.

When Monroe became president, with peace and prosperity abroad in the land, Americans found the main causes of divisiveness removed. The very times seemed to call for settling issues on a non-partisan basis rather than through confrontation. Monroe was a natural consensus builder, and fostered this purposely and effectively. His term is widely known as “The Era of Good Feeling.”